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Partnering with Green Industry companies across Northern Michigan to share resources, further professionalism, and grow the Green Industry. 

You want to increase profits, operate more efficiently,
and manage your business well. What better way to
improve than by working alongside other experts in the field?

Proudly representing members from:

  • Alcona County

  • Alger County

  • Alpena County

  • Antrim County

  • Atlanta County

  • Baraga County

  • Benzie County

  • Charlevoix County

  • Cheboygan County

  • Chippewa County

  • Crawford County

  • Delta County

  • Dicksinson County

  • ​Emmett County

  • Gogebic County

  • Grand Traverse County

  • Houghton County

  • Iosco County 

  • Iron County

  • Kalkaska County

  • Keweenaw County

  • Lake County

  • Leelanau County

  • Luce County

  • Mackinac County

  • Manistee County

  • Marquette County

  • Menominee County

  • Missaukee County

  • Montmorency County

  • Ogemaw County

  • Ontonagon County

  • Oscoda County

  • Otsego County

  • Presque Isle County

  • Roscommon County 

  • Schoolcraft County

  • Wexford County

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Ready to partner with us?

Upcoming Events


NMNLA After Hours Landscaper/Architect Sessions
Networking and Social Event







Wednesday, March 13, 2024  •  4:00-6:00 p.m.​
Held at Gypsy Distillery
(5251 Charlevoix Ave, Bay Harbor)

Sponsored by: Gypsy Distillery & Pure Property Management
Cash bar provided by Gypsy Spirits, food by Fresh Coast Sliders 


ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS BETWEEN
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS AND INSTALLERS
• Discuss the disconnect between installation to execution
• Maintenance challenges
• How can we help each
other?

Approved for 2 LA CES Professional Development Hours 
and 2 CGIP CEUs


We're pleased to bring you this event at NO CHARGE but Registration is required!
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Additional Resources

About

Case Study

This project by Vidosh North was a total transformation. What began as a patio project expanded into a full site remodel with lush gardens, outdoor living spaces, elegant masonry, and winding paths.

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Plant Profile
By Matthew Ross, Executive Director of
T
he Botanic Garden at Historic Barns Park

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Left: Snowdrops (Galanthus) are one of the earliest winter flowering plants and have sparked craze amongst plant lovers known as galanthophiles across the globe.

With snow and ice in the upcoming forecast, the blooms and blossoms are not nearly as plentiful this time of year in Northern Michigan. As the last of the native Witchhazel (Hamamelis virginiana) drop and we dream of the massive tulip display down in Holland, MI, we may be overlooking a great time to add value and interest to our clients' landscapes and our home gardens.  There is a wide range of vibrant stems, intriguing textures, and a plethora of intriguing conifers that can ignite the winter landscape.  This year I will be presenting Redefining Winter on Tuesday, January 23rd from 8:30–9:30 a.m. at GLTE, where we will be discussing underutilized trees like the Striped Bark Maple (Acer pennsylvanica) that may not get a lot of use in the landscape but can make a lasting impact if spotted appropriately.  This small tree/large shrub is an understory maple that can tolerate more shade than many of its mainstream cousins.  Its range spans all the way to the Upper Peninsula and it is hardy to USDA Zones 3-7.  Definitely not the tree for the hellstrip, it can easily be woven into a woodland landscape where it can provide structure and really stand out at this time of year when mature.  Even before they mature, their foliage can catch the light just right in the autumn in shades of light yellow to orange. There are a few cultivars available and several similar species in the trade, but I find the straight species to be a bit more resilient.  It is susceptible to canker and a variety of foliar fungal diseases but it is a good plant to help colonize the understory to provide screening during the growing season.  I personally am still waiting for someone to breed an improved variety and name it “Izzone Green” or “Spartan Strong” to really make the tree popular!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left: The upright habit of the striped maple (Acer Pennsylvanica) alongside Route 2 in the Upper Peninsula

Center: Image Used through Wikimedia Commons. Original Image from Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Right: The light capturing the golden fall color of Striped Bark Maple in Munising, MI. 

The Spartan in me feels like the perfect complements to this green barked tree as the snow starts to melt are the snowdrop (Galanthus), white blooms of Hellebores (Helleborus), and the delicate blossoms of Grecian windflower (Anemone blanda).  If you want to add further evergreen interest, think about adding in a variety of barrenwort (Epimedium), many of which will carry a purple fall color deep into the darkest days of winter before their intriguing inflorescences emerge in early Spring.  This combination of perennials provides a bit more drama in the landscape and has the ability to fill out in some of the harshest conditions including dry shade.

I hope that you take the time to survey your own gardens and look for ways to add a bit of drama to them next year!

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Clockwise from upper left: Barrenwort (Epimedium ‘Domino') has intriguing texture and the ability to thrive in dry shade, shown here planted under an evergreen canopy; Hellebore (Helleborus), also known as Christmas Rose, has the ability to flower even when blanketed with snow; Hellebore's floral display extends into the spring months when their downward facing blooms can be cut and mixed with other spring ephemerals in floating arrangements; The last blooms of Witchhazel (Hamamelis virginiana) which can hang on into early December even in Northern Michigan.  This plant adds another two whole weeks to the floral display of late autumn.

Quote of

the Month

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